‘Forests management crucial for sustainable tropical timber industry’

CLIMAT FORET BRUME SOLEIL BDProper management of tropical forests could be an asset for the planet. (Image source: Fair&Precious)The International Tropical Timber Technical Association (ATIBT) has discussed forest management strategies for promoting a sustainable tropical timber industry

“When we talk about the exploitation of tropical forests, many people associate it with deforestation. They imagine thousands of hectares of virgin forests destroyed, century-old trees burned to the ground and nature disfigured forever – all for the sole purpose of creating agricultural land or grazing to obtain land,” said ATIBT.

According to Robert Hunink, president of ATIBT, there is a major difference between deforestation and sustainable forest management.

“European consumers misunderstand the role of forest managers in attributing tropical deforestation, mainly due to the ‘mining’ of forest soil fertility for agriculture or firewood,” Hunink added.

Through the Fair&Precious brand, they will learn that the actors of our ecosystem do not plunder, but on the contrary only pick one or two trees per hectare, on the same plot, once every thirty years, noted Hunink.

To date, only companies certified in legal and sustainable forest management (certifications are issued by FSC or PEFC and controlled by certifying bodies such as Bureau Veritas, SGS Quailfor or Rainforest Alliance) can benefit from the Fair&Precious brand. In addition to these certification standards, they must comply with the country’s applicable forest code (after validation of control procedures and obtaining legal certifications). The certification is then valid for a period of five years.

The ratio of trees harvested is far lower than those left to grow naturally

At present, the vast majority of tropical timber comes directly from the virgin forest (without harvesting control) or from large plantations which are gradually replacing virgin forests.

The first is simply illegal poaching, while the second is a monoculture of exotic tree varieties that degrade the soil, threaten biodiversity and accelerate climate change.

The Fair&Precious programme provides a sustainable alternative: preserving forest resources by harvesting less than its natural increase.

Young trees, as well as seed trees, are systematically left standing since they contribute to the renewal of the forest.

Creating real local economic and social development

Fair&Precious members aim to working for local economic and social development by contributing to generate income for people and by providing them with access to services such as education, medical care and housing. Local processing is thus favoured and training in various forestry and wood trades is provided by the network’s member concession holders. By providing employment and resources to local populations, they are fighting against exodus and urban concentration.

Fighting poaching

With its sustainable approach, the Fair&Precious brand also aims to protect fauna and flora, by ensuring that animals’ habitats are made safe. In blocking the illegal trafficking of forest products, they are also able to develop programmes to combat poaching and restock endangered species.

Most environmentally friendly material available

Fair&Precious aims to restore confidence among tropical wood users and to promote the acquisition of products from sustainably managed tropical forests. The exceptional technical performance of tropical woods and their durability properties are highlighted.

Indeed, these materials have excellent resistance to external environmental factors and require no chemical treatment.

Tropical wood is particularly useful and efficient in the construction of garden decking, interior and exterior furniture, shipbuilding, etc.

Fair&Precious’ objective is not to massively increase volume sales, given its commitment to preserving the forests, but to enable these “precious" woods to regain their true place on the market.

Alain Charles Publishing, University House, 11-13 Lower Grosvenor Place, London, SW1W 0EX, UK
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