Focus on sustainable poultry production to boost farm profits

AdobeStock 81703988Sustainable poultry production is a challenge which needs to be addressed immediately to meet changing market demands and to boost farm profitability, Gill Gallagher, Sustainable Agriculture Manager at Devenish, has said

Speaking virtually at the World’s Poultry Science Association Forum (in conjunction with Poultry Information Exchange) in Australia, she said there is little time to waste in the race to provide the world’s growing population with healthy diets from sustainable food systems.

That urgency has arisen as a result of increasing policy pressures by governments which have put in place ambitious carbon reduction policies in the race to net zero.

In addition, consumers and other customers along the supply chain are - more and more - increasingly demanding action on greenhouse gas reduction and want to see that farms are adhering to sustainable sourcing policies. That has the potential to result in eco labelling on products to give consumers choice.

Meanwhile, the ability to measure the carbon footprint of poultry production offers a real insight into identifying inefficiencies and carbon hotspots in the business.

“A more efficient farm is a more profitable farm with a lower carbon footprint,” Gill Gallagher said. “From a strategic point of view, ensuring your production system is as sustainable as possible is a win-win and will only enhance the bottom line.”

She said that within the poultry production system, the best way to minimise environmental impact is to ensure a targeted diet based on precision nutrition, which has been regularly reviewed and updated using appropriate measurement techniques.

Emissions can also be reduced by using the most environmentally friendly combination of raw materials and using nutritional aids correctly to extract maximum nutrients from raw materials.

In addition, growers should minimise anti-nutritional factors which could inhibit digestion and utilisation of nutrients.

Finally, it pays dividends to ensure the bird is as healthy as possible so it can fully utilise nutrients. Nutrition does not stand alone in the drive to reduce carbon emissions but sits alongside good management and a constant focus on the health of the bird.

“Close attention to these details will not only reduce the carbon footprint but will also improve feed conversion and boost profits. Ultimately, reducing carbon pays,” she concluded.

Alain Charles Publishing, University House, 11-13 Lower Grosvenor Place, London, SW1W 0EX, UK
T: +44 20 7834 7676, F: +44 20 7973 0076, W: www.alaincharles.com

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