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Cristiano Lorenzini of OP Lorenzini Naturamica of Mantua, confirmed that the solutions provided by Arrigoni were indeed effective. (Image Source: Arrigoni)

New field tests conducted on the land of Italian industry leaders OP Lorenzini Naturamica of Mantua and Azienda Agricola Malavasi provided abundant confirmation of the efficacy of use of Arrigoni Lirsa brand agrofilms in controlling temperature, increasing plants’ yields, reducing water use and ensuring earlier ripening of the crop

Arrigoni, a constant investor in research and development, will be presenting this and other innovative solutions for protecting melons and all greenhouse fruit and vegetable crops at the upcoming GreenTech in Amsterdam, the key international show for the entire production chain, to be held from 11-13 June 2024

Examples of two agrofilms include Lirsalux and TraTec, that come with very high thermal insulation properties, mainly used to deliver earlier cropping and mitigate low winter temperatures, reducing frost damage. These products are particularly effective for the cold-weather protection of crops like melon and watermelon. Other products particularly well suited to crops like melon include Prisma and Robuxta

For late summer crops, the use of Sanalux low tunnel film is ideal, because it cuts off NIR (Near InfraRed) radiation, keeping the temperature in the tunnel significantly lower. This characteristic helps to create a healthier environment where plants can grow and prosper in June and July, the hottest months.

Last but not least, Arrigoni has a rich assortment of mulching films, also under the Lirsa brand, such as the Thermoplast range films developed for greenhouse or orchard applications and have significant effects on plant growth, increasing crop size and quality.

Cristiano Lorenzini of OP Lorenzini Naturamica of Mantua, in its specific case used the Lirsalux, Sanalux and TraTec films. He confirmed that the solutions provided by Arrigoni were indeed effective. 

“Melon growers like us can face two conflicting needs: plants transplanted early can require more heat to protect them from possible late frosts and bring production forward significantly. At the same time, plants transplanted late can still need a good level of heat but it’s also important to prevent scorching on the hottest days,” said  Lorenzini. “By using Arrigoni Lirsa brand agrofilms, we were able to achieve these aims easily, hugely reducing plant stress levels. We found plants’ output was much more uniform, with higher product degrees Brix and an overall improvement in fruit quality over a very long crop cycle,” he concluded.  

To meet Arrigoni at GreenTech, visit: stand 345 in hall 01

For more information, visit: http://www.arrigoni.it/  

The partnership aims to eradicate food waste to landfills. (Image source: CP Foods)

Dedicated to managing surplus food and reducing food loss, Charoen Pokphand Foods Public Company Limited (CP Foods) spearheads its involvement in the ‘Thailand's Food Bank’ initiative

The partnership involving the National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), the SOS Foundation, and private sector partners, aims to eradicate food waste to landfills. 

CPF Global Food Solution Public Co., Ltd. (CPFGS), the leading global food solutions provider engaged in food products and services under CP Foods, has implemented comprehensive measures to minimise food waste.

By employing meticulous inventory management strategies and extending product lifecycles through proper handling and storage, CPFGS aims to significantly curb the volume of surplus food designated for disposal. When surplus inventory is unavoidable, the company actively seeks opportunities to repurpose safe, high-quality food items through partnerships with charitable organisations and food redistribution programmes.

As part of Thailand's Food Bank project, CP Foods has implemented robust measures to minimise food waste throughout its supply chain, including optimised inventory planning, effective shelf-life management, and diverting safe, high-quality surplus food to vulnerable communities.

"At CP Foods, we prioritise responsible production and consumption practices, setting an ambitious target of Zero Food Waste to Landfill," affirmed director of logistics and distribution centres at CPFGS, Tawit Thanhakarnjanakul. “We stand ready to collaborate and contribute our expertise in studying innovative approaches to effectively manage surplus food and reduce food waste across the nation.”

For more information, visit: www.cpfworldwide.com/

Products exhibited at the event provide solutions to important economic, climatic, societal and environmental issues. (Image source: SPACE)

The next SPACE Expo, will take place from 17-19 September 2024 at the Rennes Exhibition Centre, in France

Located in Western France, Europe's largest livestock-producing region, SPACE (Salon de la Production Agricole - Carrefour Européen) has been strongly associated with Europe since its creation in 1987. The vision of its founders was and still remains to make SPACE the key event for all sectors.

Around 1,200 exhibitors and 100,000 visitors are expected to attend the event, this year. Products exhibited at the event provide solutions to important economic, climatic, societal and environmental issues. With a continued focus on new generations, their products and interactions with working farmers, the event has been rightfully recognised as being a symbol of a positive, ambitious and dynamic outlook: Empowering Generations: Let’s invent the Future

Their full and varied conference programme will cover a range of topics, making SPACE a unique meeting place for the animal farming industry. Aiming to promote the dynamic and diverse dairy industry in Western France, SPACE is also launching its new web series called ‘Milky Quest: Rendez-vous en Terres de Lait’. 

Moreover, featuring a simplified interface for smoother navigation, SPACE has recently upgraded its website. For more information about the event, visit: www.space.fr

JICA, DA, and concerned LGUs collaborate on "Project for Market-Driven Enhancement of Vegetable Value Chain in the Philippines (MV2C-TCP)" to develop inclusive FVC models tackling value chain issues. (Image source: JICA)

A collaboration between JICA and the Department of Agriculture (DA) aims to introduce Japanese technologies and business models in Benguet, Quezon, and Metro Manila to address challenges along the vegetable value chain 

Persistent challenges like price fluctuations, high distribution costs, postharvest losses, and high poverty rates among farmers hinder the agriculture sector, especially the vegetable industry. A modernised value chain is urgently needed to provide higher income for farmers and promote private sector participation and job creation.

The "Project for Market-Driven Enhancement of Vegetable Value Chain in the Philippines (MV2C-TCP)" seeks to develop inclusive Food Value Chain (FVC) models to tackle issues at various stages of the value chain.

One year into the MV2C-TCP implementation, the Joint Coordinating Committee (JCC) discussed the project's progress and future directions.

“JICA continues to highlight agriculture development as a backbone of Philippine economy in terms of its prospective impact to economic growth, poverty alleviation, job creation, promotion of healthy lives of Filipino people, among others. Also, in these years, JICA has been advocating and promoting the “Market-Oriented Approach” to the agriculture development even in other countries. As such, MV2C-TCP remains to be a relevant and important part of JICA’s assistance portfolio in the Philippines,” said OSHIMA Jiro, senior representative of JICA Philippines Office.

Aligned with DA secretary Tiu Laurel's three-year plan to modernise Philippine agriculture, the MV2C-TCP aims to spread benefits across the entire value chain and make farming viable for investors.

Collaborating with stakeholders from all stages of the vegetable value chain, the MV2C-TCP is implementing six pilot projects in target sites. These projects focus on production techniques enhancement, refrigeration system optimisation, plastic crate utilisation, modern distribution channel linkages, value addition through merchandising, and vegetable consumption promotion.

Stakeholder forums held in Benguet and Quezon provided a platform to share information about MV2C pilot projects and conduct business matching among stakeholders.

The project plans to expand pilot projects in additional municipalities in Benguet and Quezon this year. It aims to develop and disseminate inclusive FVC models comprising various verified technologies from pilot projects.

UK-Vietnam agri-trade report identifies growth opportunities, emphasising Vietnamese products' potential in UK markets. (Image source: Adobe Stock)

In the UK-Vietnam Agricultural Trade report titled 'Connecting the UK and Vietnam in agriculture, food and drink', the focus is on highlighting the driving forces behind the UK-Vietnam agricultural trade relationship and identifying potential growth opportunities for the two countries' agricultural sectors

According to the report, with the rapid expansion of Vietnamese restaurants in the UK, British consumers now have access to a variety of Vietnamese agricultural products being sold in supermarkets.

However, Vietnamese agricultural products still only account for a small proportion of imports from Vietnam to the UK, currently making up 4.8%. This situation represents a significant growth opportunity in the field of agricultural products and related items, which is expected to play a more significant role in shaping trade relations between the UK and Vietnam.

The UKVFTA Agreement officially took effect in May 2021 and is a catalyst for trade exchange. UKVFTA offers huge opportunities for the agriculture, food, and beverage industries. Most food and beverage product lines are currently benefiting from a gradual reduction and, eventually, complete elimination of tariffs by 2031 (subject to relevant tariff quotas).

According to the report, by 2023 Vietnam's fish and shellfish export value to the UK will reach nearly US$300mn, making seafood the fifth product group among the main export products from Vietnam. In January 2023, the People's Committee of Cao Phong district (Hoa Binh province) coordinated with the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development of Hoa Binh province to organise a ceremony to export to the UK the first shipment of seven tons of Cao Phong oranges. Next, in May 2023, a shipment of five tons of typical Vietnamese Ri6 durian was distributed to supermarkets across the UK.

The report also stated that although Vietnam's imports currently only account for 1% of the UK's total annual imports of US$700bn, high purchasing power and the growing Vietnamese community in the UK are the basis foundation for guaranteed future growth. Currently, the UK is Vietnam's third largest trading partner in Europe.

In addition, with the UK joining CPTPP, the accessibility of Vietnamese agricultural products will also improve. The report also emphasises that, in recent years, Vietnam's agricultural sector has been transforming towards reducing emissions, applying organic processes, and exploiting renewable energy sources. These environmental protection efforts will resonate with British consumers, who prioritise products with traceability, food safety, environmental friendliness, and ethical standards.

Additionally, as Vietnamese cuisine such as pho or banh mi becomes more popular with the British, the Vietnamese government and exporters could do better to promote brands that have been recognised and protected with geographical indication for Vietnamese agricultural products, similar to a number of British food brands such as Scottish whiskey, Ahmad, Twinings, Cadbury, and McVitie's that have successfully entered Vietnam.

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